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Showing posts from May, 2003

Unexplained Cases | Pennhurst Asylum

Written by: Rick Garner
Case Filed: 08/18/19 - Spring City, Pennsylvania
Executive Producer: Rick Garner



Pennhurst Asylum. Spring City, Pennsylvania. Officailly known as Pennhurst State School and Hospital, this property was originally named the Eastern Pennsylvania State Institution for the Feeble-Minded and Epileptic. For 79 years, its buildings housed thousands of mentally and physically disabled. It would seem many remain here. 

On November 23, 1908, the first patient was admitted. By 1912, the facility was overcrowded. At the time, the mentally ill were considered a blight on society - to be feared and not allowed to associated with the general population. A Pennhurst Chief Physician, Dr. Henry H. Goddard, even said, "Every feeble-minded person is a potential criminal."

Spciety's view on those “feeble minded” essentially excused unspeakable horrors to be exercised in the halls and rooms of Pennhurst. in 1968, reporter Bill Baldini exposed conditions at the facility in a …

Field Reports from Broadcountry Cinema 3 - Magee, Mississippi

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 5/23/03 - Magee, Mississippi
Executive Producer: Rick Garner




The Broadcountry Cinema 3 in Magee sits just off of Highway 49. By "Unexplained" standards, this 18-year-old building is practically brand new. Dozens of reports of paranormal phenomenon have caught the attention of "Unexplained" investigators and we decided to check it out for ourselves.
These strange happenings started when the building was still under construction. Owner Butch McCall was showing a friend around. "He gets this funny sound in his voice and he's like, 'Man, this place is haunted.' I'm like, 'Well, it can't be haunted! It's not built yet!'"

Hidden Secrets

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 5/16/03 - Edwards, Mississippi
Executive Producer: Rick Garner



Tucked behind 200-year-old magnolia trees lies the Yeiser House. Built in 1832, it's a house full of history going back to the Civil War. The story and events at this house actually started several hundred yards down the road on May 16, 1863, during the Battle for Champion's Hill and a little known Brigadier General Lloyd Tilghman who was shot.

Historian DeAnna Thompson-Blailock says, "If it was a sniper, (he was wounded) in the throat. And due to the blood pattern where he bled to death in the Yeiser house, it would seem like a sniper shot because of the blood pattern on the floor."

After being shot, General Tilghman was taken to the Yeiser, which was being used as a field hospital. There, in one corner of a front bedroom, Tilghman bled to death.